AIMS Society Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
The AIMS Society blog is designed to provide practical, timely ideas to help insurance agencies improve results from their marketing and sales efforts. Wishing you much success!!! For even more, consider joining the AIMS Society and you'll have access to a powerful network of agents and carrier personnel focused on excellence in sales!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: AIMS Society  insurance marketing and sales  self-improvement  Leadership  teamwork  efficiency  Networking  productivity  Social Media  Professional Development  Agency Management  CPIA designation  Technology  agency value  business value  Insurance Education  time management  sellability  PRO-to-PRO  Risk Management  Insurance Journal  producer compensation  Relax  vacation  agency sale  Branding  Paradiso Presents  Friends  Cyber Attacks  email marketing 

Delivering Exceptional Experiences for Every Customer

Posted By American Insurance Marketing and Sales (AIMS) Society, Friday, February 1, 2019


Delivering Exceptional Experiences for Every Customer


What's the key to creating outstanding customer service?

According to Nicholas Webb, a corporate strategist  and thought leader in the areas of customer experience design and innovation, the key is to build an exceptional experience for customers.

He maintains this success comes by following these principles:

  • Understand your customers by learning what they love and hate.
  • Invent human experiences across five touch points.
  • Express these experiences through digital and nondigital means.

In his book, What Customers Crave: How to Create Relevant and Memorable Experiences at Every Touchpoint, Webb defines the five touchpoints at which to invent human experiences:

1.The Pre-Touchpoint Moment
This is the research phase where potential customers explore your business via websites such as Google or Yelp. In addition to an online search, some customers may assess your physical location by driving by to look at the outside or even walk in to critique your office space and staff. Basically, potential customers are taking this time to educate themselves about you — and your reputation.

2. The First Touchpoint Moment
This sets the tone for how customers perceive your service, brand or product. It is the point when customers actually engage with you — and the point where first impressions really do matter.

Webb offers Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel and Spa as an excellent example. As guests enter the hotel, they are immediately greeted by enthusiastic, friendly staff and treated like royalty. The hotel’s goal is to help guests get in the vacation mood and jumpstart an amazing visit to the “happiest place on Earth.”

3. The Core Touchpoint Moment
Webb describes this phase as consistently reinventing great ways to serve customers. While your customers may have been happily using your service, you can’t become complacent. Instead, you need to find ways to keep them coming back. This means continuously delivering.

He highlights Trader Joe’s grocery chain as a good example of the core touchpoint. The store’s attention to detail translates into offering pumpkin spice cookies and coffee in the fall, as well as fresh vegetables and flowers in the spring. Trader Joe’s focus is always on the customer.

4. The Perfect Last Touchpoint Moment
This is the final moment that a customer has with your service or product. At this point, you must provide a memorable goodbye — one that makes them want to come back. This is your opportunity to say, “Thank you, and I hope you valued the experience enough to return."

5. The In-Touchpoint Moment
After a customer’s experience has ended, it is very important to stay connected. According to Webb, “You must approach this with an absolute commitment not to sell them anything, but rather to consistently and pleasantly provide them with ongoing value. You want them to willingly come back to you of their own accord, not because you’re shoving some One Time Only shenanigan down their throat.”

The bottom line, insists Webb, is that customer experience is more than just treating customers well. “It’s about architecting a machine that serves others,” he explains. And Webb’s five touchpoints allow any organization to create a customer experience that does just that.

Tags:  AIMS Society  email marketing  insurance marketing and sales  Leadership  Networking  productivity  self-improvement  sellability 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Top 10 Productivity Tools for Sales & Marketing Professionals

Posted By AIMS Society, Friday, November 16, 2018

Top 10 Productivity Tools for Sales & Marketing Professionals

Orchestrating a team can be challenging. Whether you have a team of five or 20, every member has a unique personality and preferences. You also may have a host of processes and systems that you're using in the office.

When was the last time you looked at how you're getting work done? Are you being as productive as possible?

When you use the right productivity tools, your team's efficiency and collaboration will increase — resulting in more sales and better organization. there are a host of technologies, apps and systems out there that are designed to improve workflow.

Here are the top resources for insurance professionals:

  1. DocuSign: Incredibly popular in the insurance industry, DocuSign is an e-signature service that helps reduce inefficient paper processes and email contracts in record time.

  2. Slack: If your team is wasting time with inefficient communication processes, consider using Slack. It’s one of the most effective ways to instantly communicate and message your team members — and it works on both desktop and mobile. You can create “Channels” for specific purposes like marketing and only invite those on the marketing team.

  3. Google Docs: This is one of the most user-friendly tools out there for document collaboration. Think of it as a free online version of Microsoft Office. You can create and share word, spreadsheet, forms and presentation files (like proposals, pitches and sales letters) with other team members in real time.

  4. CamScanner: Download this app to easily scan any document and save it as a PDF. It will even enhance the scanned images and lift out important pieces of information like dates, titles and prices. You can also add notes and drawings to your scanned images.

    Note: If you have the Google Drive app on your phone, you can not only access your Google Docs but scan receipts and documents. You can share files immediately and access them later.

  5.  Trello: This collaboration tool helps you organize and prioritize projects and tasks. You can see who’s working on what, where something is in a process and what the next steps are for each prospect. Trello is great for delegating tasks, creating automatic to-do lists and keeping things transparent.

  6. CRM: You’re in a customer-centric business, so it makes sense to have an effective customer relationship management (CRM) system. It’s essential for growing your agency and managing leads and customers every step of the way. HubSpot has a free CRM, but if you’re looking for something personalized, consider Salesforce, Insightly, Zoho and Infusionsoft.

  7. SignOn Once by ID Federation: If you struggle with maintaining passwords and IDs, you’re not alone. It’s one of the biggest pain points among carriers and agencies. SignOn Once enables one identity to replace multiple logins for insurance system users. That way, you can spend less time resetting passwords and more time focused on serving prospects and clients.

  8. Evernote: This is the system for someone who loves sticky notes and keeps infinite tabs open in their browser. With Evernote you can take pictures, save websites and write to-do lists. It’s like your very own digital notebook. You can create different sections for different areas of focus and tag each document or idea — keeping everything you may need in one spot.

  9. Voice-to-Text: You may not think this would be helpful, but have you ever thought about how much time you spend typing something instead of saying it? Or have you ever had a great idea while waiting and didn’t have time to type a note? Voice recognition software has been around for a while, but the technology is finally advanced enough for the translation to be correct instead of jumbled. Consider a robust software like Dragon or start with a free app like Cortana.

  10. Zapier: If you have plenty of leads coming in but are getting bogged down with the follow-up process, consider an automation process. For example, if you get an email with an attachment, you can set up a “trigger” that copies the attachment into your Google Drive and then alerts you in Slack. You can integrate all of your systems like email, social media, email marketing and so much more.

Tags:  AIMS Society  Branding  business value  efficiency  email marketing  insurance marketing and sales  Leadership  Networking  productivity  Professional Development  self-improvement  sellability  Social Media  teamwork 

PermalinkComments (1)
 

Turn a Prospect’s ‘No’ into a Positive Experience

Posted By AIMS Society, Friday, July 20, 2018

 

Turn a Prospect’s ‘No’ into a Positive Experience

 

When it comes to discussions about sales strategy, one of the most entrenched concepts is “don’t take no for an answer.”

 

But the reality of sales prospecting is that “no” is an answer you will probably hear — often. Despite your best efforts, it is sometimes the only answer the prospect is willing to give.

 

Insisting on changing “no” to “yes” can, in fact, do nothing more than turn off a prospect and shut you out from any future discussions about what benefits and services your company could provide in the future. Persistence in the face of a repeated “no” can lead to antagonism and frustration for both you and your prospect. Once your prospect perceives you in a negative light, trying to turn that perception around will be almost impossible.

 

Taking “no” for an answer, when done right, can turn a negative into a positive and lead your prospect to possibly becoming a valuable client.

 

At the outset, you need to respect your prospect and their answer. At that first or subsequent call, a prospect may have his or her defenses up, expecting a lengthy, ambitious pitch that does not respect their time or response. Accept “no” graciously and you just might surprise them, prevent that feeling of antagonism and leave the conversation where he or she might be willing to reconnect with you in the future.

 

After you accept a client’s refusal, don’t just walk away and treat the prospect as a waste of time, either. Having shown respect for their answer, it is now time to reach out and build a foundation for the future. Ask their permission to speak again at some point. Aim for a second conversation in the future to reconnect or send an email about something of interest to them, just to keep in touch. This is an opportunity to build a relationship and shape your brand in the prospect’s mind.

 

Your main objective should never be to force a “no” into a “yes,” but to avoid a bad sales experience. One helpful strategy is to do some homework before making the call. Identify the prospect’s need and have an answer that shows why your product is their solution. Not only does this give you a firm basis for conversing with your prospect, but it also saves time — for the both of you. First, you’ll avoid calling upon someone who has no real need for your product, and they won’t have to listen to a pitch about something that has no relevance to them.

 

Most importantly, when doing your homework, make sure the person you contact is someone who can say “yes.”

 

To prepare, turn to LinkedIn, the prospect company’s website, and any other publicly available material that helps you understand who the decision-makers are and how your product or service will benefit them. And when you make that call to that person, listen to what they are saying, ask questions, and learn how what you are selling will complement their business.

 

Respect, courtesy, and a little homework may not conclude the sale today, but invoking those concepts can open doors to a future book of profitable business tomorrow.

Tags:  agency value  AIMS Society  business value  efficiency  Insurance Education  insurance marketing and sales  Leadership  Networking  productivity  Professional Development  sellability  time management 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Why You Should Use Humor in Your Marketing

Posted By AIMS Society, Friday, June 22, 2018

Why You Should Use Humor in Your Marketing

Even after you've forgotten the content of a joke, you remember the fact that it made you laugh. Humor is a tricky little devil, extremely difficult to nail, but powerful when done right. Out of all the stories you hear throughout your week, you are most likely to share the ones that make you laugh. After all, who doesn't want to make people laugh?

Unfortunately, humor is fairly subjective. So if using humor is risky, why bother with it at all?

In a recent article for the Atlantic, Nigel Hollis writes, "The first trick of advertising is to make people pay attention. Funny ads attract attention."

Insurance is not perhaps the most intriguing of topics, and that's putting it lightly. Your brand must connect with people on an emotional level to succeed, and that's where humor has its value. This is especially true for everyday brands that might otherwise go unnoticed by the average consumer. 

Writing for Hubspot, Kim Speier states "Humor is a way to sell your brand without outwardly selling something." When you appeal to a consumer's emotions, she says, "you're able to engage them and make them remember you." And that, my friends, is half the battle.

Even if a customer may not remember the exact details of a product or the message of the ad, you've just built brand recognition.

However, that positive association is lost if the messaging isn't consistent or recognizable. Speier cautions that without brand awareness — a distinct knowledge of their consumer base and persona — marketers' attempts at humor can seem inauthentic or even offensive. Know what your brand stands for and who your target audience is before attempting to reel in laughs, and customers.

But that doesn't mean your brand can't be funny, in addition to being serious and trustworthy. Consider a few of the examples Speier provides in her blog post, ones that she chose precisely because the products are considered dull. Dollar Shave Club razors. Charmin toilet paper. State Farm insurance. Old Spice deodorant. Allstate insurance. Clorox bleach. Wonderful Pistachio's...well, pistachios of course.

Chances are you recognize most, if not all, of these names. There's a reason for that — their ads managed to tickle your funny bone.

It's easy to entertain people by marketing a cool or exciting product, as Speier says. "But the real gift is with those who can take something that people don't typically enjoy shopping for and make it an experience they will actually look forward to."

So whether your joke elicits a full-on belly laugh, a wheezing-you-can-barely-breath-laugh, a reluctant snort, a quick chuckle, or even a smile, you're on the right track.

"If there's one thing for sure, it's that people love to laugh," Speier concludes. "We could all afford to smile and laugh a little more in our lives, and if you're a brand that can make us do that, we're going to appreciate it. So keep the laughs coming!"

Tags:  agency value  Branding  business value  Goals  insurance marketing and sales  Leadership  Networking  Personal Brand  Professional Development  self-improvement  sellability  teamwork 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

What Can You Teach Me Today? Why Your Hiring Focus Needs to Change

Posted By AIMS Society, Friday, June 15, 2018

What Can You Teach Me Today?
Why Your Hiring Focus Needs to Change

When you are searching for a new hire, there's an approach to the interview that could lead to a real transformation of your agency.

"As a #Millennial — I like to hire people who I know I can learn from." That comment, which was recently shared on Twitter, comes from Tyler Olson, founder of Modern Foundation, an analytics based social and search consulting firm.

Yes, it's just a tweet, but stop to consider the potentially profound impact that kind of approach could have. Of course, every new hire will require some degree of on-the-job training, and you are looking for someone you think has the initial experience required to come in and learn your agency protocols and move forward from there. However, this one-way view of the employer/employee relationship misses what could provide a tremendous payoff.

You do need someone who can learn. But what about finding someone who can also teach? And what if you deliberately explored the teaching roles of every single hire, even entry-level workers or those in more distant support roles?

You may argue that questions such as "Tell me about your experience" or "Tell me why you're the best candidate" gets at this very issue. But those canned questions will most likely elicit a canned response. Instead, dig deeper.

Start before the interview by thinking about your agency weaknesses and opportunities, not only those related to the position you're hiring for, but even more far-reaching. If your agency struggles with internal communication, ask some questions that explore the candidate's ideas or past experience with just that. "We're always striving to improve cross-department communication—ways to make sure everyone knows what's going on and are on the same page. Have you worked with another group or organization where either you or those around you had an approach that led to improved communication and fewer misunderstandings or dropped balls?" Who knows, you may be surprised to learn that the person sitting in front of you built an organizational app or started a weekly lunch group to improve dialogue.

Next interview, keep this approach in mind. As you focus on finding more potential teachers, you'll also be positioning your agency as a place open to change and innovation — and that sounds like an agency on the move.

Tags:  AIMS Society  efficiency  Leadership  Networking  Professional Development  self-improvement  Social Media  Technology 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 12
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 

America's only Insurance Sales and Marketing Education Organization & Designation