AIMS Society Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

View all (148) posts »

The Secret to Inspiring Others & Selling Smart Ideas

Posted By Donna M. Gray, Friday, June 28, 2019

The Secret to Inspiring Others & Selling Smart Ideas

“Ideas are the true currency of the 21st Century,” writes public speaking coach and author Carmine Gallo in his book, Talk Like Ted. “So in order to succeed, you need to be able to sell your ideas and yourself persuasively. That ability is the greatest skill that will help you accomplish your dreams.”

To provide the tools to create strong presentations and deliver winning talks, Gallo studied hundreds of TED Talks and interviewed the most popular TED presenters and top researchers in psychology, communications and neuroscience. The result is expert advice on creating and delivering engaging and memorable presentations. Below are Gallo’s tips for inspiring any audience.

  1. Let Loose. Passion is contagious, but you can’t inspire others unless you are inspired. It is vital to express your enthusiasm and passion for your ideas. Identify your connection to the topic, and inspire listeners with this meaningful connection.

  2. Master the Art of Storytelling. Because stories stimulate and engage the human brain, storytellers must tell stories that touch the hearts and minds of listeners, as well as express passion and inspire.

    For an  example, listen to public-interest lawyer Bryan Stevenson deliver the 2012 Ted Talk, entitled, “We Need to Talk about an Injustice.” Stevenson’s passion for his topic generated the longest standing ovation in TED Talk history. Not only did he spend a majority of his speech sharing stories, but he also welcomed his grandmother and Rosa Parks onstage to share their personal stories, too.

  3. Have a Conversation. Only after creating an emotional connection, building rapport and gaining trust, can you practice true persuasion. In order to achieve this, your presentation should feel relaxed, similar to having a discussion with a friend. Consistent practice and internalizing the content are two ways to create this conversation.

  4. Stick to the 18-Minute Rule. Nobody likes a long, overloaded and meandering presentation. Instead, you need to inform, while also holding people’s attention. So what’s the best length? Only 18 minutes.

    TED Talks curator Chris Anderson says, “Eighteen minutes is short enough to hold people’s attention … [and if you make points precisely] … it’s also long enough to say something that matters.”

  5.  Lighten Up. Research from the Mayo Clinic shows that laughter relieves stress and increases endorphins, but improves the immune system, relieves pain and enhances mood. And humor can help charm your listeners because it makes you more likable, which in turn, makes others more willing to do business with you.

Ideas can change the direction of your life and potentially change the world. “You don’t need luck to be an inspiring speaker,” Gallo writes. “You need courage — the courage to follow your passion, articulate your ideas simply and express what makes your heart sing.”

Tags:  AIMS Society  Branding  efficiency  insurance marketing and sales  Leadership  Networking  productivity  Professional Development  sellability  time management 

Permalink | Comments (1)
 

Comments on this post...

...
Craig Most says...
Posted Friday, June 28, 2019
Storytelling is the easiest for me to utilize, seems like any audience can listen and identify to a well told story.
Permalink to this Comment }

America's only Insurance Marketing and Sales Education Organization & Designation